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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
the nickname of downtown scotty brown. then to law school, the army national guard, city and state political office where he was one of just five republicans in a body of 40 in the state senate, and then the u.s. senate. senator brown also famously found time to do a little modeling in his youth and it was through this work that he met his wife gail. i've had the pleasure to get to know scott and gail really well over the last three years. they have two daughters and make an absolutely wonderful family. i'm sure gail, hyla and arianna are very, very proud of scott and just as proud as i am to see his tenure here cut short but they should be proud of the fact that scott has accomplished a lot in three short years here in the senate. he led the charge to repeal a burdensome withholding tax that hurt small businesses, he crafted legislation for crowdfunding which allows job creators to raise start-up funds for their businesses over the internet with less red tape and he introduced legislation to ensure that children's hospitals have access to discounts on orphan drugs that are used to treat rar
. senator mikulski was just on the floor and talked about the circumstances in the city of crisfield n. that city. in that city, 32% of the population live blo live below e poverty level. 71% sustained water damage. waterman, which is one of the major industries for that community, found that they were literally unable to work and they're still unclear as to what's going to happen to their crops. so we have a serious problem. give you just two examples of people who lived through this, the storm, in c ri sfield. mary, who lived in an apartment with cody, her trained medical dog. mary suffered from epileptic seizures and cody serves as her lifeline when these seizures occur. mary has no family in the area. she cannot work due to her disability. her own source of income is a small social security check. well, when hurricane sandy hit crisfield, the water rose rapidly in her apartment, mary was forced to grab cody and nothing else and to jump out of the window and swim to safety. she lost all of her belongings, including all of her records, which might be helpful for her to be able to try
responsibility for what happened in my city was comprehensive and inescapable. citizens held the mayor's office accountable for the prosaic tasks of daily life, like trash collection, fixing potholes in the streets, snow removal, but also for executing strategies for the economic and social advancement of the city. in legislative life, by contrast, we are responsible for positions expressed through votes, cosponsorships, interviews and other means. it takes courage to declare dozens or even hundreds of positions and stand for office knowing that with each position, you are displeasing some group of voters. but we do our country a disservice if we mistake the act of taking positions for governance. they are not the same thing. governance requires adaptation to shifting circumstances. it often requires finding common ground with americans who have a different vision than your own. it requires leaders who believe, like edmond burke, that their first responsibility to their constituents is to apply their best judgment. it is possible to be elected and reelected again and again and gain prominence i
female members and friends, and all who surround us in our daily tasks. this is no lasting city, we know. may we pass through it with a little more gratitude and with a firmer determination to live the kind of lives we've been called to live. mr. president, i yield the floor. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the leadership time is reserved. and under the previous order, the senate will be in a period of morning business until 3:00 p.m. with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each. mr. mcconnell: i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: quorum call: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new jersey. mr. menendez: i ask the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. menendez: mr. president, i rise with a heavy heart at the senseless tragedy in newtown, connecticut, that took place this friday. we're all shaken up from that day, and we ask ourselves why. how could this happen in america? we grope for answers, and i hope we'll
has made a request. yes, is it a hefty $60 billion? but look at who was hit -- a big city that's the heart -- one of the heartbeats of america: new york. and a little community like crisfield. now matter h.j. you live in -- but no matter whether you live in new york city or in crisfield, maryland, you deserve the help of your government. and i say to my colleagues, let's think of the people we were sent here to represent. we weren't sent here to represent a bottom line. we were here to represent people. and i would hope that we would put into place -- that we would pass the president's request. we have great policies that were arrived at. and if you really want to honor senator inouye, let's honor the way his own code of conduct -- a gentle way, a civil way, a consensus builder, a bipartisan builder, and a worker to move this bill. senator inouye chaired the full committee on aeption pros these -- on appropriations these last couple of years. his own staff shared a story with me. and it is relative with me here. he said, i chair the defense committee -- subcommittee,ances and t
ballooned since the 9/11 attacks. and you're looking at cities that have made up implausible scenarios for terrorist attacks. room to cut? >> guest: i think so, yeah. i'm not an expert in the homeland security area but i'm familiar with the general point and i agree when the federal government starts giving out grants like this, there's lots of room for abuse and made-up roles and made-up responsibilities to try to get federal money. i think that has taken place to some extent in that area and i would take a hard look cutting back. >> host: isabel sawhill, what are you hearing here? >> guest: no one can disagree with the idea we ought to make sure that the government has well-performing programs. i would give the current administration pretty high marks on worrying about that. they have a whole program in place to evaluate programs and where the evidence suggests they're not working, they are trying to cut back or else reform the programs. let me give you an example, the head start program, very popular program, that put use, used as federal money to serve three and 4-year-old kids fro
in my city was fficehat happened in my city was comprehensive and inescapablee citizens have the mayors of thic accountable. trash collection, fixing stree potholes in the streets, snow removal, but also for executingc strategies, economic and sociali advancement of the city's. w in legislative life, by contrast , we are responsible for positions expressed through votes, co-sponsor shipped in interviewsit, and other means. declared dozens or even hundreds of positions, stand for office d knowing that with the position ou are displacing some group of voters. t we do our country a disservice if we this -- mistake the active taking positions for government. they're not the same thing. ite government requires. adaptation through said -- shifting circumstances.n it also requires finding common ground with americans to have ar different vision than your own. it requires leaders you believet like edmundo burke, that their s first responsibility to their ay constituents is to apply their best judgment. a a is possible to be elected ann reelected again and again and gained prominence in the sena
this city was unacceptable to him, and he made that clear to all of us. danny's focus was on people, on the infrastructure that they depend on in their communities, on the most vulnerable, on our military families, and on the state of hawaii. mr. president, if danny inouye was a giant here in the senate, he was a mountain back home. hawaii would not be hawaii without danny inouye. he fought for his state. he would not allow it to be ignored, and he made it a better place to live and work for george bush reagan administrations to come. -- for generations to come. mr. president, as a senator from another state far from washington, d.c., i learned a lot from senator inouye about how to advocate for the people who elect you and how to make sure they never get lost here in the mix. through his quiet and shining example, we all earn willed a bit -- we all learned a bit more about bipartisan. i so remember danny huddling on the floor working closely with his good friend, senator stevens from alaska. we all learned a bit more about effectiveness. he knew how to get things done. we all learn
much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm bill. we do too much of that around here on -- on other areas of public policy. we should do what we've always done in the senate long before i got here, passing five-year bills with regard to the farm bill. it does create economic opportunities in rural areas. it sustains the consumers and businesses that rely upon our rural economy. the senate-passed farm bill would reduce the deficit by approximately $23 billion through the elimination of some subsidies, the consolidation of programs, and -- and producing greater efficiencies in the delivery mechanisms in programs. now, we're having a big debate about the end of the year a
or a particular city looking for that. so i think considering that we tested that we've seen there's enough interest that 30 partnerships would apply for the. that bush is i think the promise of the strategy which has been used in germany of these national manufacturing innovation hubs. and i think that is something that we are going to look to promote in a second term. >> thank you. paul friedman with every child matters. we are very, i applaud you for your comments about not having is fighting against money for children versus money for research and other vital needs. so the question is where do we find more revenue? and have you considered taxes on stock transfers, stock transactions or other kind of innovative, carbon tax, other kind of approaches were we can find new revenue so that will be possible for us to not fight amongst ourselves for resources? >> well, it's going to shock you for you and industry that i am not here to make news on new revenue. we are busy fighting right now to ensure that we have a budget agreement. it's very balanced and i think part of that balance, having en
with two feet of snow and 60-mile-an-hour winds when a blizzard hammered the city. it caused 36 deaths, stranded 1,500 people on lake shore drive, which i go back and forth on every day and still find it hard to imagine, 1,500 people stuck on lake shore drive. it resulted in $3.9 billion in losses. april was the wettest april in 116 years in the midwest, forcing the mississippi and missouri rivers to flood thousands of square miles. this is 2011 i'm talking about. there were 326 tornadoes in may throughout the midwest and southern u.s., resulting in the deadliest may since 1933. wildfires burned 3 million acres of property across the western states, causing over a billion dollars in damages. and hurricane irene devastated the atlantic coast, causing $4.3 billion in damage. a very small amount compared to sandy but significant still for those affected. nationwide, the financial consequences of weather-related disasters and climate change hit an historic new high last year. u.s. disasters cost over $55 billion in damages. federal, state and local governments are paying out more every yea
violations. many people have heard of timbuktu but don't know it's a city in northern mali. in a site where extremists have behaved much like the taliban did in afghanistan before 9/11, destroying sacred and religious historic artifacts, imposing a harsh version of sharia that has meant amputations, stoning, violation of women's rights and free speech and religious free exercise rights, fundamentalling changing the tolerance and inclusive history of mali and creating with it a humanitarian crisis as more than 400,000 malians have fled, either internally displaced within mali or going to neighboring countries with refugees. with growing ties between these terrorists and nigeria, libya and throughout the region, aqim we believe may now use its safe haven in northern mali to plan for regional or trans-national terrorist attacks. and just as we should not have ignored developments in afghanistan which seemed a remote and troubled country when the taliban took it over more than a dozen years ago, so, too, we would ignore the chaos in northern mali at our peril. in fact, secretary clinton has rec
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)